Huron County Tops State with Most Wind Farm Incidents


Huron County’s wind farms are becoming notorious with having twice the number of incidents than any other county in Michigan.

Recent data obtained from Caithness Windfarm Information Forum, a global incident collection group in the UK showed that since 1990 Huron County lead Michigan in terms of wind farm accidents and incidents. The first incident recorded in the county was in 2010.

Blade failure was the number one incident statewide with Human Health coming in second due to lawsuits for health issues. Most of the legal health issues occurred in Mason County on Michigan’s west coast against Lake Winds Energy Park near Ludington. The state did not report any incidents of fire, the second most common wind farm incident globally.

Details and a map of each incident can be obtained at Thumbwind.com

State of Michigan – Wind Farm Incidents*

1990 – 2016 – By Type

Blade Failure 10
Human health 7
Miscellaneous 6
Environmental 3
Structural failure 3
Mechanical failure 3
Transport 2
Fire 1
Total 35

 

State of Michigan – Wind Farm Incidents

1990 – 2016 – By County

Huron 15
Mason 7
Leelanau 3
Missaukee 2
Bay 2
Sanilac 1
Wayne 1
Wexford 1
Livingstone 1
Monroe 1
St. Clair 1
Total 35

Blade Failure – By far the biggest number of incidents found was due to blade failure. “Blade failure” can arise from a number of possible sources, and results in either whole blades or pieces of blade being thrown from the turbine.

Human Heath – Incidents include reports of ill-heath and effects due to turbine noise, shadow flicker, etc. Such reports are predicted to increase significantly as turbines are increasingly approved and built in unsuitable locations, close to people’s homes.

Miscellaneous – Component or mechanical failure has been reported here if there has been no consequential structural damage. Also included are lack of maintenance, electrical failure (not led to fire or electrocution) etc. Construction and construction support accidents are also included, also lightning strikes when a strike has not resulted in blade damage or fire.

Environmental – Includes oil spills and wildlife death due to turbine placement

Structural/Mechanical failure – “Structural failure” is assumed to be major component failure under conditions which components should be designed to withstand. This mainly concerns storm damage to turbines and tower collapse. However, poor quality control, lack of maintenance and component failure can also be responsible.

Transport – Most accidents involve turbine sections falling from transporters, though turbine sections have also been lost at sea. Transport is the single biggest cause of public fatalities.

Fire – Fire is the second most common accident cause in incidents found. Fire can arise from a number of sources – and some turbine types seem more prone to fire than others.

Ice Throw – These are listed here unless they have caused human injury, in which case they are included under “human injury”

Human Injury – Involved wind industry or construction/maintenance workers, and involved members of the public or workers not directly dependent on the wind industry (e.g. fire fighters, transport workers)

Fatality – Wind industry and direct support workers (divers, construction, maintenance, engineers, etc), or small turbine owner/operators.  Public fatalities, including workers not directly dependent on the wind industry (e.g. transport workers)

 

“What Have I Done” – Farmers Regret Saying Yes To Turbines


Re-posted from 2012

By  signing that contract, I signed away the control of the family  farm, 

and it’s the biggest regret I have ever experienced and will ever experience.”

Gary Steinich, Cambria, Wisconsin. June 2011

A sad and disheartening story of three Wisconsin farmer’s experiences with a wind developers. The first is a personal narrative of Gary Steinich’s dealing with Florida Power and Light near the Wisconsin Town of Cambria. He outlines how he was lied too, sees huge portions of his land taken out of production, fields sub-divided by access roads and cable rights of way, removal of 1000’s tons of top soil and how he has to ask permission to walk on his own property.

This is an open letter first posted in 2011. It includes pictures of development taking place and an actual copy of the lease that Gary and his father signed. Truly recommended reading if you’re considering signing a wind farm lease.

The important message here is to hire an attorney experienced with wind lease agreements and land zoning and mineral rights.

Wisconsin Farmers Regrets Saying Yes To Turbines

Michigan Wind Farm Accidents


We have managed to find a reliable global source of information on specific incidents, accidents structural failures and even tragic fatalities occurring on all wind farms since 1999. Detailed information will be provided and update from various official and  media sources and placed as a resource on our site.

Over the next several weeks we will be gathering and presenting the data specific to Michigan  wind farms on our site for your information. The best way to stay up to date with us is to Like our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter or subscribe to our email updates.  All of these will let you know when there is an update.

Thanks for your readership and ongoing support.

Thumb Town of Pinnebog


Pinnebog, Huron County: Walter Hume, "the Daniel Boone of Hume Township," became the first settler in the area in 1844; this settlement was first called Pinnepog (Chippewa for partridge drum); but there was another Pinnepog five miles north on Saginaw Bay, so this one changed to Pinnebog ("a high sounding and dignified way of saying pine bog"), while the other one changed to Port Crescent; Arthur Heminger became the first postmaster of Pinnebog on April 15, 1863; the office was closed on Jan. 2, 1872, but was restored on Dec. 19, 1879; it was named from its location near the Pinnebog River. Today much of the original town is gone. Pinnebog is home to the famous Heck’s Bar.

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