Mystery of the Remains of An Michigan Indian Chief Found Near Bay Port In 1933

Chippewa Indian Chief

In the 1920s, there was a flurry of archaeological activity in Michigan to record and catalog Native American villages, garden beds, and burial mounds. As a result, the entire Saginaw Valley has 100s of identified sites. The identification, and looting, of Indian artifacts from burial mounds, was a common occurrence.

White Rock: The Sacred Cornerstone of Michigan’s Thumb

White Rock Cover

Indigenous Peoples of Michigan, the Anishinabeg, view the White Rock on the edge of the Lake Huron shore as a sacred site. The rock was much, much larger than it appears today. (Which is 2019 is mostly underwater). The Indian ensured that fresh game and food items were placed on the site as an offering. Gitchie Manitou or Great Spirit would recognize the offering by the Anishinabeg as a token of thanks for the bounty and richness of the peninsula.