Tag Archives: Michigans Thumb

Michigans  Thumb, in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, is a region and a peninsula so named because the Lower Peninsula is shaped like a mitten. ThumbWind focus’s many of its stories on Michigan’s Thumb region.

Sebewaing History – A Busy Harbor

Lumbering Era in Michigan in Sebewaing Harbor

Sebewaing River Harbor

The lumbering era in Michigan’s Upper Thumb from 1860-1880 resulted in booming towns all along the shoreline. Sebewaing was no exception. While it did not benefit from proximity of being on Lake Huron like Sand Beach, (later named Harbor Beach), or having a deep river outflow like Caseville, it’s historical  spot as a rich hunting area by native Americans and natural outflow to Saginaw Bay by the Sebewaing River predestined it as a natural gathering spot.

While researching another topic. I ran across these rare pictures taken in the Sebewaing river area in the late 1800’s. I was surprised such large ships could enter as the early plat maps show only a narrow river entrance into the town. It turns out that Sebewaing was a bit of a shipbuilding and repair site. It’s yet another bit of history to savor. If only for a moment.


Vilola_Sebewaing

Schooner Viola in Sebewaing harbor. Source: Ralph K. Roberts


Drukee Sebewaing Docs 1887

Schooner  G.R. DURKEE, 1887, attributed to being taken in Sebewaing. (Doubtful) Dowling Collection, University of Detroit – Mercy


JC_Liken_Sebewaing DocksSteambarge J.C. Liken 1873, taken in Sebewaing. Source: Ralph K. Roberts


Michigan History

 

Advertisements

Drinking Water Contamination in Caseville’s Water System

From April 2018 – Last Updated April 2, 9:15 am.

Micro Plastic
Water Testing – Pixabay/CC0

Online reports from WNEM and other news outlets have reported that recent tests of Caseville, Michigan’s water supply showed excessive levels of Trihalomethine. Trihalomethanes are formed as a by-product when chlorine is used to disinfect drinking water. Trihalomethanes forced the first water safety regulations to be issued after passage of the U.S. Safe Drinking Water Act in 1974.

Chemical Byproduct in Water System Seen in 2016 Testing

Caseville said they are seeing 2017 average test results at of Trihalomethine at 88 parts per billion.  Caseville’s 2016 Water Report showed measurements of Trihalomethine ranging from 40 to 100 parts per billion.  Four tests were conducted in 2016 with an overall average at 74 parts per billion. The safety standard is 80 parts per billion.

We spoke with Troy Hartz, Superintendent of the Caseville Water Plant. Caseville’s water supply comes from Saginaw Bay. He noted that the measurements in August have the highest level of Trihalomethine due to the warmer water from the lake. Hartz noted that the Michigan DEQ informed him that there are other Michigan water systems who draw surface water from lakes who are also experiencing the high Trihalomthine measurements during August testing. 

Water Quality Steps Being Taken 

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has been brought in to the Caseville Water Plant. The DEQ wants to determine the best way to address the problem and comply with the water safety standard. Hartz indicated that adjustments may be made of the amount of chlorine applied at Caseville’s pumping station to address the drinking water contamination.   

Caseville has not asked residents to seek other water sources but has asked residents with health concerns to consult with their doctor.

Long-term exposure to high levels of Trihalomethanes can lead to kidney or liver damage and an increased risk for cancer.

Related Stories


Michigan's Thumb ThumbWind