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Beach Closures in Michigan’s Upper Thumb

8/13/21 – Beaches Reopen in Huron County

The following bathing beaches are now Open: Caseville County Park Bathing Beach, Port Crescent State Park Day Use Bathing Beach, and Port Crescent State Park Camp Bathing beach.

No bathing beaches are closed.


8/12/21 – Several Beaches Closed in Huron County

UPDATE: The Huron County Health Department has reopened the Beach at Wagener County Park’s Bathing Beach.

The Huron County Health Department has ordered the following bathing beaches CLOSED:

  • Caseville County Park Bathing Beach
  • Port Crescent State Park Day Use Bathing Beach
  • Port Crescent State Park Camp Bathing Beach

Re-samples were taken today and the results will be sent out tomorrow.

8/11/21 – Wagener County Park Bathing Beach is Closed

UPDATE: The Huron County Health Department has close the Beach at Wagener County Park’s Bathing Beach.

On Tuesday, August 10th, a composite sample of the three samples collected in three to six feet of water cannot exceed 300 Escherichia coli (E.coli) colonies per 100 ml of water.

Test conducted on August 10th showed E.coli levels at 920.8 per ml of water. Two times the allowable limit.

What are The Symptoms of E.Coli Poisoning

Signs and symptoms of E. coli infection usually begin three or four days after exposure to the bacteria. But you may become ill as soon as one day after exposure to more than a week later. Signs and symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea, which may range from mild and watery to severe and bloody
  • Stomach cramping, pain, or tenderness
  • Nausea and vomiting, in some people

Source: Mayo Clinic

Causes of E.Coli Contamination At Beaches

Only a few E. coli types cause diarrhea. The E. coli strain is part of an E. coli that generates a toxin that destroys the small intestine lining. This may result in bloody diarrhea. When you swallow this strain of bacteria, you have an E. coli infection.

E. coli, unlike many other disease-causing bacteria, can induce an infection even if only a tiny amount is consumed. As a result, E. coli can get you sick if you eat a little undercooked hamburger or swallow a mouthful of contaminated pool water.

Human and animal feces may pollute ground and surface water, including streams, rivers, lakes, and water used to irrigate crops. Although public water systems use chlorine, ultraviolet light, or ozone to kill E. coli, some E. coli outbreaks have been linked to contaminated municipal water supplies.

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