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A Ghost Town in the Thumb


Port Cresent State Park Beach SouthPort Crescent State Park is one of the largest state parks in southern Michigan.  Located at the tip of Michigan’s “thumb” along three miles of sandy shoreline of Lake Huron’s Saginaw Bay, the park offers excellent fishing, canoeing, hiking, cross-country skiing, birding, and hunting opportunities.  However a little known aspect of this park is that it sits on the location of a ghost town.

Pinnebog Confusion

Walter Hume established a trading post and hotel near the mouth of the Pinnebog River in 1844. From these humble beginnings the area took the name of Pinnebog, taking its name from the river of which it was located. However, a post office established some five miles upstream also took its name from the river. To avoid confusion the  town changed its name to Port Crescent for the crescent-shaped harbor along which it was built.

Port Crescent had two steam-powered sawmills, two salt plants, a cooperage whichPort Cresent manufactured barrels for shipping fish and salt, a gristmill, a wagon factory, a boot and shoe factory, a pump factory, a brewery, several stores, two hotels, two blacksmith shops, a post office, a depot and telegraph office, and a roller rink. Pinnebog employed hundreds of area residents. Others worked at blockhouses where they extracted brine from evaporated water to produce salt. At one time a this 17 block village boasted of a population of more than 500

Port Crescent prospered as a lumber town from about 1864 to 1881. One sawmill became so busy salvaging thousands of trees felled in one of the infamous fires experienced by the Midwest in 1871 that it added a 120-foot brick chimney to help power the plant. In 1881, another fire swept through the Thumb region, destroying the area’s timber resources.


port cresentDo you love Michigan’s Thumb? So do we. However we were frustrated on not seeing cool T-shirts that reflect our favorite spots. So we created ThumbWind-Mercantile. This on-line shop offers T’s unique to Michigan’s Thumb and can’t be found anywhere else. Check it out.


The Town of Port Crescent Declines

When the timber in the Pinnebog River basin was gone, the town began to decline.  The lumber mills closed, as did the firewood-fueled salt plants. Workers dismantled some of the buildings and an 800-foot dock, moving them north to Oscoda, Michigan. Some Port Crescent residents moved their houses to nearby towns. By 1894, all of the buildings in Port Crescent were gone, leaving few traces of the town behind. Nathaniel Bennett Haskell, who owned the sawmill and salt plant on the west side of the river, began to export white sand which was used in the manufacture of glass. This continued until 1936.l

Port Crescent State Park

After  World War II, the  demand for public use areas along shoreline property stimulated Port Cresent State Park River Bankinterest for an additional state park in the Thumb. Twenty years later, the Michigan Department of Conservation acquired possession of 124 acres of fine woodland at this place for a new state park. Port Crescent State Park was officially established on September 6, 1959.

Today little remains of the former town. Foundations can be seen, in the Organization Area, where a structure stood. The lower 10 feet the old sawmill chimney is a prominent part of the park entrance.


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Caseville Firefighters Grill For Charity


Each year the Caseville Fire Department puts an apron on to grill up some of the finest straight up cheeseburgers in town. On the first Saturday of Cheeseburger in Caseville festival the firehouse is opened up to the community and the grills are fired up. For a mere $5 you can have a 1/4 pound of deliciousness and savor it among hundreds of friends and supporters. Despite a bit of rain, the 2016 event was packed with patrons lined down the block.

Firehouse T-shirt sales are still going on across the street from the station. Each sale benefits community programs that the Fire Department supports across the Upper Thumb.

Caseville Memories


Postcards do a great job of capturing a moment in time. We found these gems throughout the Internet and made the collection from the 1930s thru the 1960s. They are fascinating glimpse of Caseville Michigan’s the past. Its also amazing on what has not really changed over the past 80 years. Many buildings and landmarks are still visible today.


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Sunrise Side

Do you love Michigan’s Thumb? So do we. However we were frustrated on not seeing cool T-shirts that reflect our favorite spots. So we created ThumbWind-Mercantile. This on-line shop offers T’s unique to Michigan’s Thumb and can’t be found anywhere else. Check it out.

The Ark


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You may not even notice it at first. Your driving along a country road enjoying the sites of grazing animals, crops emerging and fields broken by wind breaks provided by trees planted long ago. Then you spot it. The Ark.

The grey timber looks warped and wrapped. The old planks, taken from the virgin forests that once dominated the thumb have been intertwined. What was once a working farm building is now an art form. It sits among debris from decades of agriculture work. A rope is draped along a fieldstone wall.

The Emergency Ack was completed by sculpturing artist Scott Hocking in 2015. He has transformed an 1800s barn into a large object denoting sanctuary and safety. The Ark can be found about a mile south of Oak Beach on Oak Beach road and Fehner.